Available Plugins:

Mix3 (New)

Bez  (Not new, but still rather useful)

Note: downloads of plugins for ASP are now from the Aftershot Pro plugins repository.


 

MIX3 - version 1.0.0 for B5; version 1.0.1 for ASP
Version 1.0.0 released 12 March 2012. Note: Mac version not included yet in the B5 version.
Version 1.0.1 for ASP released 18 July 2012, the only change being compatibility with the asPluginManager plugin.

Mix3 for B5    

CHANGE LOG

New in V1.0.1

Compatibility with the asPluginManager plugin.

DESCRIPTION OF SETTINGS

Mix3 is a simple black and white channel mixer for Bibble 5 and AfterShot Pro. It produces B&W images by mixing the R,G,B channels. It roughly preserves average luminosity (although 'roughly' is the operative term) by taking a weighted average of R,G,B with the slider values as weights.

(Some old-timers will recall that the Andy plugin for Bibble4 had a channel mixer like this, which could be used as a simple B&W channel mixer by turning off the film and paper settings. The replacements for Andy - Andrea & Nostlagia also have such a mixer, but you can't turn off film and paper like you could in Bibble4.)

Mix3 also has its own exposure slider, which means if you happen to mix the channels outside the (0,65535) interval you can use the exposure slider to bring the resulting luminosity back inside the interval without it being clipped. It probably isn't needed given the weighted average calculation, but it's there if you need it.

One possible use of Mix3 is to produce pseudo infra-red images, by boosting red very high and pushing blue very low. If you want to do this you may find that the sliders don't have enough range. You can increase the range by editing the Mix3.ui file. Look for +300 and -300, but make sure that you edit both the slider and the edit box - there should be six instances of each number. The same is true if you think that the range as shipped is too wide. It's hard to know how wide to set the range of each of the four sliders. I've tried to strike a balance, but if you want any of them wider or narrower then it's not hard to edit the Mix3.ui file.

(But note: if you set each of the R,G,B sliders to -100 then the image will go black, as you've set each of the channels to zero. Any other combination of the sliders is ok, but some extreme negative settings can produce odd effects.)

The default position of the plugin is to run late in the processing pipe, just before curves (but before 'Bez - Late' in ASP or 'Bez - RGB' in B5). The 'Early' option runs the plugin before sharpening (and before 'Bez - Early' in ASP or 'Bez - LAB' in B5). Hopefully this should give you enough flexibility to place it either before or after most other plugins. The difference between Mix3 in 'Early' and 'Late' mode is quite noticeable in B5 but negligible in ASP - I'm not sure why this is (maybe it's because in ASP plugins run in linear gamma).

Source Code: When you install the plugin the source code is installed in a 'source' sub-folder for the Mix3 plugin wherever plugins are installed on your system. The B5 version of this plugin uses the 5.0SDK and the ASP version not surprisingly uses the ASP 1.0 SDK. Mix3 is open source.

 


 

BEZ

Bez is intended to do two things:

(i) Provide some new tonality manipulation controls. The major advance is the tone curve tool, but
     there are also some other new ones that may be useful;
(ii) Bring commonly used tonality manipulation controls into one place.

Bez is open source. The source files are included in the package and will be installed with the plugin in its sub-folder.

These are the versions you can download from this page:
1.0.1 (for ASP), 0.5.1 (For B5), 0.4.1 (For B5)

 


 

Bez 1.0.1 for AfterShot Pro
Version 1.0.0 released 4 February 2012.
Version 1.0.1 released 18 July 2012, the only change being compatibility with the asPluginManager plugin.

––» DOWNLOAD BEZ 1.0.1 «––

Bex 100 dialog

CHANGE LOG

Missing:

LAB & RGB modes are both gone - HSL & HCL are like LAB mode.
The BW checkbox is gone - use saturation = 0 instead.
The Blacks slider is gone - use the ASP Blacks tool instead.
Bez contrast has completely gone - use Sig Contrast for contrast reductions.
The Bibble Tone Tools panel is gone - use customToolsUI.txt instead.

New in V1.0.1

Compatibility with the asPluginManager plugin.

New from V0.9.8 –» V1.0.0

The effect of Sig Middle has been reversed for contrast reductions, so that values above 50 will brighten the image, the same as for contrast increases.

New since V0.5.1:

Early: controls when in the pipe Bez executes.
HSL & HCL:
either HSL or HCL colour spaces are used - similar to LAB mode.
B5:
import B5 settings as a starting point for ASP edits.
Opacity: reduces the overall effect of the plugin.
Saturation: saturation can be adjusting in HSL/HCL space simultaneously with luminosity changes.
Sigmoidal contrast now allows negative values for contrast reduction.
Integers: All the sliders and edit boxes are now (0,100) or (-100,100) integers and the edit boxes are spinboxes with up and down arrows.

DESCRIPTION OF SETTINGS

Early: controls when in the processing pipe Bez executes. If "Early" is checked, Bez executes just before the LAB stage, much like the old LAB option, otherwise Bez executes just before curves, in about the same spot as the old RGB option.

HCL: This version of Bez undertakes all its calcutions in either the HSL colour space or HCL. Both of these are similar in their effect to the LAB mode in older versions of Bez. Choose whichever works for you. HSL is the default. Most sliders work on the L channel. Saturation works on the S channel in HSL or C channel in HCL. There shouldn't be the sort of dramatic increases in saturation that occurred in RGB mode in V0.5.1 just by changing luminosity.

B5: Import your B5 settings, as a starting point for edits in ASP. Any subsequent edits will not effect your B5 settings. Nor will hitting the Bez reset button. But hitting CTRL-R WILL RESET YOUR B5 SETTINGS! This is not ideal, but I honestly think that my approach is better than the alternatives. If you would like Aftershot Pro to have separate namespaces for B5 and ASP settings, so that this won't happen, then please support me by asking for it using this feedback form.

Opacity: reduces the overall effect of the plugin. Audio engineers apparently call this "Dry / Effect". Opacity will not affect saturation if saturation is set to zero, on the assumption that you want to a B&W conversion.

Saturation: saturation can be adjusted in HSL/HCL space simultaneously with luminosity changes. If you want the sort of dramatic saturation increases that occurred in Bez 0.5.1 in RGB mode.... over-use the saturation slider!!! If you want a B&W image, set saturation to zero.

Lighten Sig:"Lighten" is a special of mine. What I often do with an image to create a sense of light is to grab the (192,192) point on the curves tool and drag it up. So this is like a mid-tone adjustment weighed towards the highlights. Or perhaps a contrast-enhancing mid-tone adjustment.

This tool doesn't do exactly the same thing as my curves tool technique, it only simulates it. This is as close as I can get it in the highlights. By design it has less impact on the shadows than my curves technique. In fact, for small adjustments it actually darkens the shadows slightly, in which case you may prefer "Lighten Gam".

(For the technically minded, this is actually a sigmoidal contrast adjustment with a varying midpoint, with ß=1 and α between 2 and 10. So as the contrast is increased, so is the midpoint for the contrast adjustment.)

Lighten Gam: This is quite similar to the "Lighten Sig" tool, but it has a bit more effect on the shadows, and so is very close to grabbing the (192,192) point on the curves tool and dragging it up. Which Lighten tool to use? They are quite similar. Depends on how much impact you want on the shadows. This tool has more.

(For the technically minded, this is an quasi-gamma adjustment with 1 < gamma < 3.5:
      new_luminosity = 1 - (1 - old_luminosity) ^ gamma

Midtones: This tool is designed to simulate dragging the (128,128) centre-point on the curves tool up and down. I guess it should be similar to dragging the middle grey triangle in the curves tool left or right. For Lightroom users, I think it is similar to the "Brightness" slider in the "Basic" tab.

Sigmoidal Contrast: This is a superior (smoother) approach to increasing contrast, and it allows the centre point of the contrast adjustment to be varied. It is exactly the same as the tool in Thomas Baruchel's "Lab Contrast" plugin, except new in the ASP version is the ability to reduce contrast. The theory is described on page 44 in this paper, for the mathematically minded.

Tone Curve: This is the main reason I wrote this plugin. It's my attempt to simulate the "Tone Curve" tool from Lightroom. It's not as sophisticated as the LR version, but it seems to work well enough, especially in combination with the other tools in this plugin.

In the first versions of Bez the tone curve had four zones. I felt that the impact of each zone on the others was too great, so in later versions I switched to 5 zones and changed the maths slightly to limit the impact on non-adjacent zones. However sometimes the impact on other zones is too small with 5 zones, so in this version there are both 4 and 5. You can actually use both if, for example, you want a tighly controlled change in the highlights and wider change in the shadows. Having these two versions of the tone curve is a partial workaround for not being able to adjust the boundaries between the zones (as you can in LR).

Note: Many of these sliders have been scaled to allow extreme adjustments when you really need it. So use with caution where you don't!

Source Code: When you install the plugin the source code is installed in a "source" sub-folder for the Bez plugin wherever plugins are installed on your system. This version of the plugin uses the ASP 1.0 SDK.

 


 

Bez - v0.5.1 for B5
This version released 16 December 2010.
(This version fixes a bug in 0.5.0 in which the Lighten Gam control in Lab mode could turn pure white to pure black.)

DOWNLOAD
(Installation instructions are in the Bibble help file under "Editing Images | Plugins")

 

Bez with Bez contrastBez without Bez Contrast

Two alternative user interfaces are provided.
The one on the left is the default.    The one on the right is explained under "Bez Contrast".

Bibble Tone Tools: These are just the same tools that you will find on the "Basic Adjustments" tab and the "Tone / Exposure" tab. They are duplicated here to avoid continual tab switching. (I'd like to get them inside Bez rather than as a separate collection of tools. Perhaps in the next version.)

RGB: (new in 0.5.0): By default Bez operates on the luminosity channel in Lab mode, so (as I understand it) this avoids impacting on colour when making tonality adjustments. However if you check the "RGB" option then Bez operates quite late in the processing pipeline in (R,G,B) mode. This means that you can have other tools and plugins operate first, especially the Bibble B&W plugin.

BW: (new in 0.5.0): This option converts the image to B&W. If you are in Lab mode (with RGB unchecked) then it simply takes the luminosity channel. If you are in RGB mode it takes the same weighted average of the three colour channels as does the Bibble B&W plugin for its luminosity conversion.

Lighten Sig: (new in 0.4.0, renamed in 0.5.0) : "Lighten" is a special of mine. What I often do with an image to create a sense of light is to grab the (192,192) point on the curves tool and drag it up. So this is like a mid-tone adjustment weighed towards the highlights. Or perhaps a contrast-enhancing mid-tone adjustment.

This tool doesn't do exactly the same thing as my curves tool technique, it only simulates it. This is as close as I can get it in the highlights. By design it has less impact on the shadows than my curves technique. In fact, for small adjustments it actually darkens the shadows slightly, in which case you may prefer "Lighten Gam".

(For the technically minded, this is actually a sigmoidal contrast adjustment with a varying midpoint, with ß=1 and α between 2 and 10. So as the contrast is increased, so is the midpoint for the contrast adjustment.)

Lighten Gam: (new in 0.5.0): This is quite similar to the "Lighten Sig" tool, but it has a bit more effect on the shadows, and so is very close to grabbing the (192,192) point on the curves tool and dragging it up. Which Lighten tool to use? They are quite similar. Depends on how much impact you want on the shadows. This tool has more.

(For the technically minded, this is an quasi-gamma adjustment with 1 < gamma < 3.5:
      new_luminosity = 1 - (1 - old_luminosity) ^ gamma

Midtones: This tool is designed to simulate dragging the (128,128) centre-point on the curves tool up and down. I guess it should be similar to dragging the middle grey triangle in the curves tool left or right. For Lightroom users, I think it is similar to the "Brightness" slider in the "Basic" tab.

Blacks: This tool darkens the image and adds weight to the shadows by shifting the histogram to the left. It's designed to simulate moving the black triangle in the curves tool to the right. This is exactly the same as the the "Bl. level" control in the "Blacky" plugin by kbarni. It's also similar to the "Blacks" control in Lightroom.

This tool is designed to clip the blacks. So it is different to the other Bez tools which are designed to try and avoid clipping as far as possible. Of course if you push any tool far enough then it will cause clipping, but "Blacks" will do it faster.

(Note: this is different to kbarni's "Blacks" control, which is a mid-tone adjustment weighted to the shadows region. I've renamed his "Bl. level" to "Blacks" because it makes more sense in my plugin.)

(Note also that the similarity with the Lightroom "Blacks" tool is to increasing it from its default value of 5. It doesn't simulate the sort of shadow recovery you seem to get in Lightroom by reducing its "Blacks" slider below 5.)

Sigmoidal Contrast (new in 0.4.0): This is a superior (smoother) approach to increasing contrast, and it allows the centre point of the contrast adjustment to be varied. It is exactly the same as the tool in Thomas Baruchel's "Lab Contrast" plugin. The theory is described on page 44 in this paper, for the mathematically minded.

(You may notice very, very small differences in the effect on the histogram between Thomas's plugin and mine, because very, very minor differences in how the calculations are performed, but it doesn't affect the image.)

Bez Contrast: This tool is deprecated, as I realised that sigmoidal is the better approach. "Bez Contrast" was an alternative approach to increasing and decreasing contrast in earlier versions of Bez using my own implementation of Bezier curves. I left "Bez Contrast" in the plugin partly in response to user requests to preserve it, and partly because it allows a reduction in contrast.

Bez contrast does not automatically appear in the default 0.5.1 UI. If you want to have access to its controls, you need to:

If you have images where you have used "Bez Contrast" in the past and use a Bez UI without it, the plugin still implements the saved settings, but doesn't show you what they are and you can't change them other than a Bez reset. The alternative UI file is shown above on the right.

Tone Curve: (4 zone tone curve new in 0.5.0): This is the main reason I wrote this plugin. It's my attempt to simulate the "Tone Curve" tool from Lightroom. It's not as sophisticated as the LR version, but it seems to work well enough, especially in combination with the other tools in this plugin.

In the first versions of Bez the tone curve had four zones. I felt that the impact of each zone on the others was too great, so in later versions I switched to 5 zones and changed the maths slightly to limit the impact on non-adjacent zones. However sometimes the impact on other zones is too small with 5 zones, so in this version there are both 4 and 5. You can actually use both if, for example, you want a tighly controlled change in the highlights and wider change in the shadows. Having these two versions of the tone curve is a partial workaround for not being able to adjust the boundaries between the zones (as you can in LR).

Note: Many of these sliders have been scaled to allow extreme adjustments when you really need it. So use with caution where you don't!

Source Code: When you install the plugin the source code is installed in a "source" sub-folder for the Bez plugin wherever plugins are installed on your system. This plugin still uses the 5.0 SDK.

 


 

Bez - v0.4.1 for B5
This version released 9 November 2010.
(This version fixes a bug in 0.4.0 in which the blacks control could turn pure black to pure white.)

DOWNLOAD
(Installation instructions are in the Bibble help file under "Editing Images | Plugins")

I have kept this version here for those who may find the UI for 0.5.1 too "busy". This version does not have:

This version of Bez operates on the luminosity channel, so (as I understand it) this avoids impacting on colour when making tonality adjustments.

Bez with Bez contrastBez without Bez Contrast

Two alternative user interfaces are provided.
The one on the left is the default.        The one on the right is explained under "Bez Contrast".

Bibble Tone Tools: These are just the same tools that you will find on the "Basic Adjustments" tab and the "Tone / Exposure" tab. They are duplicated here to avoid continual tab switching. (I'd like to get them inside Bez rather than as a separate collection of tools. Perhaps in the next version.)

Lighten: (new in 0.4.0) : "Lighten" is a special of mine. What I often do with an image to create a sense of light is to grab the (192,192) point on the curves tool and drag it up. So this is like a mid-tone adjustment weighed towards the highlights. Or perhaps a contrast-enhancing mid-tone adjustment. Or perhaps an inverted gamma adjustment.

This tool doesn't do exactly the same thing as my curves tool technique, it only simulates it. This is as close as I can get it in the highlights. By design it has less impact on the shadows than my curves technique.

(For the technically minded, this is actually a sigmoidal contrast adjustment with a varying midpoint, with ß=1 and α between 2 and 10. So as the contrast is increased, so is the midpoint for the contrast adjustment.)

Midtones: This tool is designed to simulate dragging the (128,128) centre-point on the curves tool up and down. I guess it should be similar to dragging the middle grey triangle in the curves tool left or right. For Lightroom users, I think it is similar to the "Brightness" slider in the "Basic" tab.

Blacks: This tool darkens the image and adds weight to the shadows by shifting the histogram to the left. It's designed to simulate moving the black triangle in the curves tool to the right. This is exactly the same as the the "Bl. level" control in the "Blacky" plugin by kbarni. It's also similar to the "Blacks" control in Lightroom.

This tool is designed to clip the blacks. So it is different to the other Bez tools which are designed to try and avoid clipping as far as possible. Of course if you push any tool far enough then it will cause clipping, but "Blacks" will do it faster.

(Note: this is different to kbarni's "Blacks" control, which is a mid-tone adjustment weighted to the shadows region. I've renamed his "Bl. level" to "Blacks" because it makes more sense in my plugin.)

(Note also that the similarity with the Lightroom "Blacks" tool is to increasing it from its default value of 5. It doesn't simulate the sort of shadow recovery you seem to get in Lightroom by reducing its "Blacks" slider below 5.)

Sigmoidal Contrast (new in 0.4.0): This is a superior (smoother) approach to increasing contrast, and it allows the centre point of the contrast adjustment to be varied. It is exactly the same as the tool in Thomas Baruchel's "Lab Contrast" plugin. The theory is described on page 44 in this paper, for the mathematically minded.

(You may notice very, very small differences in the effect on the histogram between Thomas's plugin and mine, because very, very minor differences in how the calculations are performed, but it doesn't affect the image.)

Bez Contrast: This tool is deprecated, as I realised that sigmoidal is the better approach. "Bez Contrast" was an alternative approach to increasing and decreasing contrast using my own implementation of Bezier curves. Like sigmoidal contrast, the mid-point can be adjusted. I left "Bez Contrast" in the plugin partly in response to user requests to preserve it, and partly because it allows a reduction in contrast.

If you want to save screen real estate, there is an alternative user interface (.ui) file packaged with the plugin, which hides Bez Contrast. To use it, simply rename the "Bez.ui" file in Bez's ui sub-folder to something else, and then rename "Bez WITHOUur system. This plugin still uses the 5.0 SDK.T Bez contrast.ui" to "Bez.ui" and restart Bibble. If you have images where you have used "Bez Contrast", then if you use the alternative .ui file the plugin still implements the saved settings, but doesn't show you what they are and you can't change them other than a reset. The alternative UI file is shown above on the right.

Tone Curve: This is the main reason I wrote this plugin. It's my attempt to simulate the "Tone Curve" tool from Lightroom. It's not as sophisticated as the LR version, but it seems to work well enough, especially in combination with the other tools in this plugin.

Note: Many of these sliders have been scaled to allow extreme adjustments when you really need it. So use with caution where you don't!

Source Code: When you install the plugin the source code is installed in a "source" sub-folder for the Bez plugin wherever plugins are installed on your system. This plugin still uses the 5.0 SDK.